15 Demographic Survey Questions with Examples – Plus How to Ask Them (2022)

British rockers The Who once sang, “Who are you? Who who, who who? I really want to know!” The lyrics to that song capture exactly what demographic survey questions are trying to get to the bottom of! Of course, these types of questions can be sensitive to some survey participants. So, it’s important to have a reason for asking demographic questions, and then going about asking them in the right way.

Create your demographic survey, form, or poll now!

What is Demographics?

Demographics is the analysis of a population’s characteristics (or a subset of that population). Demographic questions may be asked by government agencies, private research firms, broadcast media, websites, and consumer surveys. Often, demographics are key to creating targeted marketing campaigns that appeal to specific groups of consumers. With a better understanding of their consumer, companies can craft targeted advertising campaigns that are generally much more effective than “shotgun-style” mass marketing efforts that try to appeal to everyone. Demographics are also popular in politics; in 2012, Barack Obama made a demographic gamble, appealing to younger generations, and that paid off big time.

Of course, there is an entirely different line of research – psychographic studies – which try to uncover the beliefs, feelings, thoughts, biases, and other psychological factors that motivate people. But when it comes to demographic studies, just remember The Who. Who are you? What motivates you can come later.

Why Ask Demographic Questions?

Regardless of your industry, it’s important to understand just who is paying attention. Are you developing new products? Running for office? Starting up a company? If you conduct a survey to gauge response, you’ll want the demographic data of survey respondents to steer your initiatives in the right direction.

Demographic questions, sometimes known as screening questions, are particularly useful if you’re looking to gather some background information about people. When used properly, demographics allow you to get to know your target audience, making it easier for you to communicate with them and meet their needs.

15 Types of Demographic Questions to Consider, Examples, & How To Ask Them

Asking demographic questions is one thing, but obtaining the actual information is another. Questions about peoples’ personal lives can leave them uncomfortable and may cause them to opt out of your survey. So, it’s important to understand the reasons for asking certain demographic questions (a good rule of thumb is to ask as few as possible, only asking for must-have information) and knowing how to ask them.

1. Age

Age is a very common demographic question regardless of the topic, as it can impact a person’s attitudes, health, hobbies, politics, and purchases. A multiple-choice format with ranges for each answer is the most typical way to ask the question, as it does leave some room for privacy by not pinpointing an exact number.

Example: “What is your age?”

  1. Under 18
  2. 18 – 29
  3. 30 – 45
  4. 46 – 59
  5. Over 60
  6. Prefer not to answer

When creating age-related demographic questions, age ranges will differ based on the survey topic; for example, you’re likely to focus on breaking down the ranges of the younger demographic in a video game survey, while breaking down the ranges of the older demographic retirement planning survey.

Pro-Tip: Just as age ranges are used to maintain some privacy, you should not ask for a specific birth date or year. This is seen as too intrusive and likely to turn off participants.

2. Gender

Gender is a standard demographic question, for sure, but it should be approached in a sensitive way since it can be a complicated topic. Today, there are more than two accepted gender roles in modern society so instead of just asking what the respondent’s gender is, ask “what gender do you identify as?”

Example: “What gender do you identify as?”

  1. Male
  2. Female
  3. Transgender
  4. Non-binary
  5. Prefer not to answer
  6. Other

Be sure to always use the word “gender” and not “sex.” The American Psychological Association differentiates between gender and sex as follows: “Gender is cultural and is the term to use when referring to women and men as social groups. Sex is biological; use it when the biological distinction is predominant.”

Because most surveys are intended for market research, you’ll be looking for the gender a person identifies as. Gender is more perspective-based, providing flexibility for the participant.

3. Ethnicity

Cultural backgrounds and their traditions can play a large part in an individual’s attitudes, beliefs, and purchase behavior. However, this topic has become more politically charged than ever, so if possible, you may want to avoid asking it altogether. If you feel it’s necessary for proper research, we suggest creating checkboxes that allow participants to check as many answers as they want; after all, America is a melting pot.

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Example: “Please specify your ethnicity (check all that apply)”

  • Caucasian
  • African-American
  • Latino or Hispanic
  • Asian
  • Native American
  • Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
  • Other/Unknown
  • Prefer not to say

As with all sensitive demographic questions, it’s important to give respondents the ability to refrain from answering.

4. Education

Education is an important demographic as it offers insight into the type of work a participant may be doing and how much they may be earning. In addition, people’s life perspectives and political beliefs often change based upon their level of education. Understanding education levels will also help when determining messaging; for example, someone with a master’s degree in business may not need to be told the basics of an investment strategy, while an electrician probably doesn’t need to know how circuitry works.

Be sure to always include options for trades and apprenticeships; simply focusing on degrees is likely to turn off those participants, as it assumes their post-high school efforts weren’t worthy of recognition.

Example: “What is the highest degree or level of education you have completed?”

  1. Some High School
  2. High School Diploma
  3. Bachelor’s Degree
  4. Master’s Degree
  5. Ph.D. or higher
  6. Trade School
  7. Apprenticeship
  8. Prefer not to say

5. Employment

A participant’s employment status gives researchers insight into their buying power, and often an employed person will have a significantly different take on questions than an unemployed person. Of course, some participants will think their employment status is none of your business or may be afraid that somehow information will get back to their employers and could cause them trouble. So, always provide an out.

Example: “What is your current employment status?”

  1. Employed Full-Time
  2. Employed Part-Time
  3. Self-Employed
  4. Seeking Opportunities
  5. Retired
  6. Prefer not to say

Remember to include the “self-employed” option, which is increasingly popular in today’s gig economy, and use “seeking opportunities” rather than “unemployed” as the latter can make respondents feel that you think they are lazy. The best demographic survey questions are non-judgemental!

6. Location

Location is a popular demographic question as it can impact a person’s life perspective (think rural versus urban lifestyles, or US-based individuals versus those living abroad). By understanding where your audience lives, you may be able to pinpoint who they may vote for, for example, or what types of products they would consider buying. Demographic information related to location can also help you find new markets to expand into.

Example: “Where is your home located?”

  1. North America/Central America
  2. South America
  3. Europe
  4. Africa
  5. Asia
  6. Australia
  7. Caribbean/Pacific Islands
  8. Other: ______
  9. Prefer not to say

Want to get really specific? Just narrow down the options based on where you’re surveying:

Example: “Where do you live?”

  1. New York
  2. Illinois
  3. Michigan
  4. Florida
  5. Texas

Pro-Tip: Don’t ask for a specific address unless there is a transaction involved or you are shipping something to the participant. Anything other than country, state, city, and county will appear shady to most participants and cause them to walk away.

7. Marital Status

Why does it matter if someone is married? Well, marital status helps researchers understand who participants are interacting with during their everyday lives. For example, a married person’s spending habits, and the places they frequent, may be very different from that of a single person.

Example: “Are you married?”

  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. In a domestic partnership
  4. Prefer not to say

It’s a good idea to include the “domestic partnership” option as some couples simply don’t like the concept of marriage, but live together as if they were married. Additionally, some same-sex couples in certain countries are not legally allowed to marry but may live together as if they were and are for all intents and purposes, married.

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8. Sexual Orientation

Understanding the sexual orientation of adults has become more important over the years for health, economic, and social surveys. Of course, retailers and brands also want to know what percentage of their audience is gay, lesbian, or bisexual for consumer-focused campaigns.

While questions around education and employment may be able to tiptoe around asking income questions, there’s no demographic question that will really let a researcher know if the participant identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual without just asking. So, if you need to know, just ask:

Example: “What is your sexual orientation?”

  1. Heterosexual/Straight
  2. Homosexual/Gay or lesbian
  3. Bisexual
  4. Other
  5. Prefer Not to Answer

You’ll note that transgender and non-binary are not included here as they were in the gender category. That’s because they are not considered “orientations,” but rather how someone identifies.

For more on this topic check out the UCLA Williams Institute Report.

9. Household Income

Household income, or HHI, reveals how much income is being earned by everyone under the same roof. This sum includes the participant’s income, their spouse’s, and any other people living in their house. Collecting this information helps researchers understand the amount of buying power potential customers control.

As with most questions, this can be seen as “none of your business,” so always use a range to soften things, and always offer an out or you could lose perfectly good participants for nothing.

Example: “What is your annual household income?”

  1. Under $25,000
  2. $25,000 – $49,000
  3. $50,000 – $74,000
  4. $75,000 to $99,000
  5. Over $100,000
  6. Prefer not to say

10. Language

¿Habla usted inglés? Pratar du engelska? 英語を話せますか… Understanding your customers’ first language helps build a stronger relationship with them. It can also reveal some important cultural details about them. Remember, just because two participants are from the same place, doesn’t mean they speak the same language – especially in a melting pot like the United States. Their language differences can impact their values, customer needs, and goals.

As with ethnicity, we suggest creating checkboxes that allow participants to check as many answers as they want since they may speak many languages fluently.

Example: “Which languages can you speak fluently? (Check all that apply)”

  • Arabic
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Mandarin
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Swedish
  • Other

Pro-Tip: There are thousands of languages in the world but over half the world’s population speaks just 23 languages. Remember this when tailoring your survey questions to match the expected target audience in your survey.

11. Birthplace

A person’s birthplace can reveal significant details about their life. For example, someone born in one country who then moved around the world may have been reacting to professional, political, or social factors. This can have a serious impact on their wants, needs, and expectations as a customer.

Example: “Where were you born?”

  1. North America/Central America
  2. South America
  3. Europe
  4. Africa
  5. Asia
  6. Australia
  7. Caribbean/Pacific Islands
  8. Other: ______
  9. Prefer not to say

Some researchers find birthplace to be an unnecessary piece of information; after all, the participant moved away from there and is living a new life elsewhere. Others find it important because of cultural leanings. Ultimately, it will depend upon the type of survey you’re conducting.

12. Political Affiliation

Do you want to know a person’s political affiliation? It’s best to just come out and ask, as always, with an out.

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Example: “Which political party are you part of?”

  1. Democratic Party
  2. Republican Party
  3. Independent
  4. Prefer not to answer

If you’re more interested in where they stand on certain issues, you may want to ask about their political view rather than their political party.

Example: “How would you describe your political view?”

  1. Very Liberal
  2. Slightly Liberal
  3. Neither Liberal nor Conservative
  4. Slightly Conservative
  5. Very Conservative
  6. Prefer not to say

13. Voting Status

Just because someone identifies with a political party, doesn’t mean they’re actively voting. This demographic question is designed to determine if a person is active in local or national politics. The question can be asked in general, or can be tied to a particular area as seen below:

Example: “Are you registered to vote in ____?”

  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. Prefer not to say

14. Family and Dependents

Kids play a huge role in the purchasing decisions of their parents (and also can influence their attitudes and personal values). So, customers with children are going to have different needs than those who don’t. For researchers, it’s important to understand these differences in order to appeal to their audience. This applies to everything from a political campaign to the release of a new toy!

Example: “How many children do you have?”

  1. 0
  2. 1
  3. 2-4
  4. 4+
  5. Prefer not to say

Unless you’re running some sort of sweepstakes in which names are necessary, remember it’s not a good idea to ask for specifics about any child; even just their name is generally off-limits. Asking these kinds of questions is usually unnecessary and they are bound to raise a red flag with parents.

15. Religion

Religion can dramatically impact the moral values of your customers, whether you agree with them or not. Religions can determine the kind of people they associate with, the types of foods they’ll eat, the type of clothing they’ll wear, and the type of entertainment they’ll consume.

Religion, like politics, can be a hot-button issue that’s best avoided if possible. If understanding the religious beliefs of participants is important, just remember to always provide “other” and “prefer not to say” options. Since many people aren’t religious at all, you could begin your question with “if applicable,” or provide “non-religious/non-practicing” as an option.

Example: “If applicable, please specify your religion.”

  1. Catholicism/Christianity
  2. Judaism
  3. Islam
  4. Buddhism
  5. Hinduism
  6. Other: ______
  7. Prefer not to say

Demographic Survey Pictures

Let’s face it, demographic questions can get boring, and most survey respondents have been asked them hundreds of times adding to the tediousness of answering them. One way to make your demographic survey more engaging is to use demographic survey pictures. When you ask questions with pictures, you ensure that the question is being communicated properly. This is especially important when the survey is being sent to an area where many languages are spoken.

For example, in the U.S., California is the most linguistically diverse state, with more than 220 languages spoken. So, if you’re looking to survey Californians, simply sending a survey in English may not work. Using survey pictures, however, gets the message across regardless of language. Below is an example of how to ask questions with pictures when conducting a demographic survey.

Conclusion

Not everyone is going to want to answer your demographic questions. The best way to gain their participation is to explain the purpose of the survey upfront and what the data will be used for. If your survey is anonymous and secure, you’ll want to emphasize this as well. Participants have nothing to fear by providing demographic information if they know their information is confidential and protected. For more ways to increase survey participation, check out our blog 10 Ways to Improve Survey Response Rates.

Ready to begin creating your demographic survey? Get started now with SurveyLegend. Our pre-designed templates are easy to use and easy on the eyes. They’re also secure, so you can gain peoples’ trust and participation. Sign up today!

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Any demographic survey questions you think we missed? Any advice of your own on how to ask demographic questions on a survey? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

Create your demographic survey, form, or poll now!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What are demographics?

Demographics is the analysis of a population’s characteristics (or a subset of that population). Demographic questions are often asked on surveys in order to understand a participant’s background.

Why are demographic questions important in a survey?

Demographic questions help researchers gather background information about people in order to make informed decisions when communicating with or marketing to a particular audience.

Where do demographic questions go in a survey?

Demographic questions should be placed at the top of a survey. This weeds out unqualified candidates immediately, saving time during analysis.

What are some standard demographic survey questions?

While most surveys will never use them all, there are 15 demographic questions considered standard: Age, Gender, Ethnicity, Education, Employment, Location, Marital Status, Sexual Orientation, Household Income, Language, Birthplace, Voting Status, Family/Dependents, Religion, and Political Affiliation.

FAQs

How do you ask for demographic data? ›

Follow the lead set by the U.S. Census Bureau and other government institutions when using this demographic question. First ask, “Are you of Hispanic, Latino, or of Spanish origin?” (ethnicity), followed by a race identification question like, “How would you describe yourself?”

How do you answer demographics? ›

Make responses anonymous.

Demographic information examples where this can ring true, include: income level, employment status, race, and ethnicity. If you're surveying for broad demographic patterns or trends, consider making responses anonymous—and be sure to let your respondents know that's the case.

What questions should I ask in a survey? ›

Good Survey Questions: 12 Essential Questions to Ask
  • Question #1: What was the purpose of your visit today? ...
  • Question #2: Were you able to complete the purpose of your visit today? ...
  • Question #3: What other products or services should we offer? ...
  • Question #4: Where exactly did you first find out about us?

How do you ask age range in a survey? ›

How to ask for age in a survey
  1. When asking for age or an age category in an online survey, try to avoid using drop-down menus for response options.
  2. If you're asking for the year of birth, you must ensure that respondents provide all four digits.
Dec 1, 2020

Why are demographic questions important in a survey? ›

Demographic questions in a survey allow researchers to gain background information on their participants. These questions provide context for the collected survey data, allowing researchers to describe their participants and better analyze their data.

Where do demographic questions go in a survey? ›

Many survey researchers will answer “Definitely at the beginning,” and others will say, “No, at the end is the best place.” Some may even suggest putting the most important demographic questions at the beginning and save the less important demographic questions for the end.

What are the 6 race categories? ›

OMB requires that race data be collectd for a minimum of five groups: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. OMB permits the Census Bureau to also use a sixth category - Some Other Race. Respondents may report more than one race.

How do you explain demographic data in research? ›

What Are Demographics? Demographic analysis is the study of a population-based on factors such as age, race, and sex. Demographic data refers to socioeconomic information expressed statistically, including employment, education, income, marriage rates, birth and death rates, and more.

How do you ask gender in a survey? ›

When asking about sex as a category, words like male, female and intersex should be used. Gender identity refers to the internal/psychological sense of self, regardless of what sex a person was assigned at birth. When asking about gender as a category, words like woman, man, and trans* should be used.

What are the types of demographic data? ›

Demographics
  • Age.
  • Economic characteristics.
  • Marital status.
  • Race.
  • Sex.

What are the 5 types of survey questions? ›

Guide to the Five Types of Survey Questions
  • Open-Ended Questions.
  • Multiple Choice Questions.
  • Ordinal Scale Questions.
  • Interval Scale Questions.
  • Ratio Scale Questions.
Jun 12, 2022

What are the 4 types of survey questions? ›

6 main types of survey questions
  • Open-ended questions.
  • Closed-ended questions.
  • Nominal questions.
  • Likert scale questions.
  • Rating scale (or ordinal) questions.
  • 'Yes' or 'no' questions.
Jan 19, 2022

How do you ask someone to complete a survey example? ›

Consider offering them context regarding the overall goal of your survey and why you selected them. For example, try writing something like "We are inviting you to take our survey about our recently released product since you bought this product on our website."

What is an example of a questionnaire? ›

Some examples of a questionnaire are: Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire: This type of research can be used in any situation where there's an interaction between a customer and an organization. For example, you might send a customer satisfaction survey after someone eats at your restaurant.

What are the main qualities of a good questionnaire? ›

Following are the essential of a good questionnaire:
  • Limited number of questions: The number of questions should be limited as far as possible. ...
  • Simplicity: The language of the question should be simple and easily understandable. ...
  • Logically arrange: The question should be arranged logically.

What open ended questions? ›

What are open-ended questions? Open-ended questions are questions that cannot be answered with a simple 'yes' or 'no', and instead require the respondent to elaborate on their points. Open-ended questions help you see things from a customer's perspective as you get feedback in their own words instead of stock answers.

What are the age group categories? ›

Age Categories, Life Cycle Groupings
  • Children (00-14 years) 00-04 years. 110. 00-04 years. 05-09 years. 120. 05-09 years. ...
  • Youth (15-24 years) 15-19 years. 211. 15-17 years. 212. 18-19 years. ...
  • Adults (25-64 years) 25-29 years. 310. 25-29 years. 30-34 years. 320. ...
  • Seniors (65 years and over) 65-69 years. 410. 65-69 years. 70-74 years. 420.
May 8, 2017

What close ended questions? ›

A closed-ended question, by definition, is a question that could be answered with a one-word answer or a simple “yes” or “no.” In research, a closed-ended question refers to any question in which participants are provided with options to choose a response from.

What are the 3 races? ›

Triple Crown, in American horse racing, championship attributed to a three-year-old Thoroughbred that in a single season wins the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness Stakes, and the Belmont Stakes.

How many races of people are there? ›

At the federal level, race and ethnicity have been categorized separately. The most recent United States Census officially recognized five racial categories (White, Black or African American, Asian, Native American/Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander) as well as people of two or more races.

What are the basic demographic concepts? ›

The study of demography covers five basic topics: the size of the population; its distribution across geographic areas; its composition (e.g., age, sex, race, and other characteristics); changes in population size, distribution, and composition over time; and the determinants and consequences of population growth.

How do you describe demographic characteristics? ›

The word is derived from the Greek words for people (demos) and picture (graphy). Examples of demographic characteristics include age, race, gender, ethnicity, religion, income, education, home ownership, sexual orientation, marital status, family size, health and disability status, and psychiatric diagnosis."

How do you use demographic in a sentence? ›

Noun The town's demographics suggest that the restaurant will do well there. The newspaper will be making some changes in order to adapt to the region's shifting demographics. The demographics of the disease are changing, and we are seeing much younger people being affected by it.

What are the 4 genders? ›

In English, the four genders of noun are masculine, feminine, common, and neuter.

Why is gender important in a survey? ›

Importance of Gender Questions in a survey

Surveys can provide more valuable data if the questions are asked consciously. Asking gender questions in a survey could provide an insight into patterns among different gender categories.

What are the 5 demographic factors? ›

Demographic segmentation variables
  • Age. Age is the most basic variable of them all, albeit the most important because consumer preferences continually change with age. ...
  • Gender. Men and women generally have different likes, dislikes, needs, and thought processes. ...
  • Income and occupation. ...
  • Ethnicity and religion. ...
  • Family structure.
May 11, 2022

What are the 5 characteristics of demographics? ›

This information usually includes gender/sex, age, race, religion, and socio-economic status.
  • Gender/Sex. On many applications, forms, and surveys, respondents are asked to specify their gender. ...
  • Race/Ethnicity. Demographics often include racial identification. ...
  • Age. ...
  • Religion. ...
  • Socio-Economic Status.

What are four types of demographic facts? ›

Most Common Demographics Examples
  • Age.
  • Gender.
  • Race.
  • Marital status.
  • Number of children (if any)
  • Occupation.
  • Annual income.
  • Education level.

Where do demographic questions go in a survey? ›

Many survey researchers will answer “Definitely at the beginning,” and others will say, “No, at the end is the best place.” Some may even suggest putting the most important demographic questions at the beginning and save the less important demographic questions for the end.

How do you ask for ethnicity? ›

Is There a Right Way to Ask Someone About Their Ethnicity?
  1. Begin a relationship. Invite them to coffee or lunch where you can get to know one another better. ...
  2. Listen to their stories and experiences. Ask questions like, “Tell me more about yourself.” Listen to what they share. ...
  3. Be sensitive. Pause for a moment.

What is a demographic survey? ›

The U.S. Census Bureau compiles information from demographic surveys to produce statistics that describe populations and their characteristics, such as age, education, housing and income.

Why are demographic questions important in a survey? ›

Demographic questions in a survey allow researchers to gain background information on their participants. These questions provide context for the collected survey data, allowing researchers to describe their participants and better analyze their data.

What is an example of a questionnaire? ›

Some examples of a questionnaire are: Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire: This type of research can be used in any situation where there's an interaction between a customer and an organization. For example, you might send a customer satisfaction survey after someone eats at your restaurant.

How do you ask someone about their identity? ›

How to ask for someone's name and where they are from politely or indirectly?
  1. Which is correct? May I ask you what's your name? May I ask you what your name is?
  2. Which is correct? Could you tell me where are you from? Could you tell me where you're from?
Aug 19, 2016

What are the 6 race categories? ›

OMB requires that race data be collectd for a minimum of five groups: White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. OMB permits the Census Bureau to also use a sixth category - Some Other Race. Respondents may report more than one race.

What are the 5 main different segments for demographics? ›

Demographic segmentation groups customers and potential customers together by focusing on certain traits that might represent useful markets for a business. What are the 5 main different segments for demographics? The five main demographic segments are age, gender, occupation, cultural background, and family status.

What are the types of demographic data? ›

Demographics
  • Age.
  • Economic characteristics.
  • Marital status.
  • Race.
  • Sex.

What close ended questions? ›

A closed-ended question, by definition, is a question that could be answered with a one-word answer or a simple “yes” or “no.” In research, a closed-ended question refers to any question in which participants are provided with options to choose a response from.

Check out these demographic examples and survey questions to help you build spot-on buyer personas at your company.

It involves asking questions about your customers' personal lives and how they became the people they are today.. Plus, we've included some demographic examples and questions you should use in your next customer survey.. You can use this information to make informed decisions about your marketing, sales, and customer service strategies.. Common demographic examples include age, gender, income, education, and religion.. Gender Age Ethnicity Location Education Marital Status. ________ (Short Answer Space)D. Prefer not to say Age is a standard demographic question that should be included in every survey.. By having this information available, you'll have a better understanding of why some customers may answer questions differently than others.. Prefer not to say Another standard question you should ask is about the location of the participant.. Prefer not to say. These are the demographic questions that should be included in almost every survey you create.. Household Income Employment Family and Dependents Living Status Voting Status Language Place of Birth Religion Political Affiliation. Prefer not to say Another cultural influence that's prevalent in many people's lives is religion.

Better understand your audience by collecting their demographics data to give you better insights and market segmentation.

By surveying with demographic survey questions, you don’t waste time finding the most effective route to potential sales, giving you the most bang for your buck.. For example, questions about participant’s age, gender, and income level are considered demographic data.. Analyze results to find trends By separating the received data into groups by categories of demographic survey questions, you’re able to look for patterns.. A survey evaluating the product or service, featuring demographic survey questions, will allow you to match desired results to an audience profile.. Understand why people have responded to a survey question the way they have There are some survey results that can be explained using demographic data, so it becomes a useful dataset in itself.. There are some general demographic survey questions that should come up in every survey.. In addition to the general questions, you’ll also have some content-specific demographic survey questions that are relevant, depending on the contents of the main survey.. Like many demographic questions, family questions can be sensitive.. It’s helpful to place the demographic survey questions at the beginning or the end of the survey, but each option has its risks and rewards.. These easier questions, which participants will know the answers to (e.g. their age and gender), could help them warm up to the act of answering questions - preparing them for the upcoming main survey section.. However, it does delay the start of the survey main section, and some participants may be nervous about supplying their information, so you run the risk of people abandoning the survey and non-completion.. By default, we recommend you include all the general demographic questions, though there will be cases when some questions should be excluded (for example, if it will lead to harm towards the participant or if there are relevant legal reasons).. If you make your demographic survey questions mandatory (in survey systems , this provides a * next to the question, which means participants can’t move on until they answer), this guarantees an answer.. On the other hand, not all demographic questions may be needed, if the question does not match up to the survey's end-goal.. For example, in an employee experience survey (where you’d most likely want participants to remain anonymous), demographic questions like language, location of office, and age can help make generalizations

The effectiveness of CSAT surveys depends on asking the right questions. Here are 57 customer satisfaction survey questions to help you get actionable insight from customers.

Here are sample feedback questions that help you target opinions on overall experience, product or service usage, as well as customer motivations:. Here are sample customer satisfaction survey questions to help you evaluate customer experience after purchases:. Here are customer satisfaction survey questions to help you assess how well your support team resolved customer issues or provided them the information they needed:. Multiple choice questions (e.g. choose A, B, C) Likert scale questions (e.g. choose on a rating scale of 1 to 10) Matrix questions (e.g. how satisfied are you with each of the following aspects of your experience?. Very satisfied to very dissatisfied) Open-ended questions (e.g. explain your answer) Demographic questions (e.g. age, gender, education category) Ranking questions (e.g. rank these items in order of importance) Image choice questions (e.g. choose the image showing the better user experience) Click map questions (e.g. click on the part of the image you like the most) Slider questions (e.g. drag the slider to rate your answer)

Writing survey questions is part art, part science. The wording you choose can make all the difference. ✓ Find out how to write the perfect survey today.

These problems span various survey question types from rating scale questions to open-ended to multiple choice.. Consider whether the question format will be intuitive to your respondents, and whether you should add help text such as “click/tap and drag on the bar to select your answer” Qualtrics includes the option for an open field where your respondent can type their answer instead of using a slider.. Use open-ended question structures like “How do you feel about…” “If you said x, why?” or “What makes a good x?” Open-ended questions take more effort to answer, so use these types of questions sparingly.. There are countless great examples of writing survey questions but how do you know if your types of survey questions will perform well?. This question puts the center of the scale at fantastic, and the lowest possible rating as “Pretty Good.” This question is not capable of collecting true opinions of respondents.. An open-ended text response question counts for about three multiple choice questions depending, of course, on the difficulty of the question.. While not totally inclusive, these seven survey question tips are common offenders in building good survey questions.. To learn more about survey question design, download our eBook, The Qualtrics Handbook of Question Design or get started with a free survey account with our world-class survey software .

We’ll guide you through how to analyze your survey data with methods and examples you can apply right away.

You’ve collected your survey results and have a survey data analysis plan in place.. Now it’s time to tap the power of survey data analysis to make sense of the results and present them in ways that are easy to understand and act on.After you’ve collected statistical survey results and have a data analysis plan , it’s time to begin the process of calculating survey results you got back.. Then once you have results, you can effectively analyze them using all the data analysis tools available to you including statistical analysis, data analytics, and charts and graphs that capture your survey metrics.. Take a look at your top survey questions Determine sample size Use cross tabulation to filter your results Benchmarking, trending, and comparative data Crunch the numbers Draw conclusions. For example, if you held an education conference and gave attendees a post-event feedback survey , one of your top research questions may look like this: How did the attendees rate the conference overall?. Well, say you did ask this question in your conference feedback survey after last year’s conference.. If you don’t have data from prior years’ conferences, make this the year you start collecting feedback after every conference.. In the case of our conference feedback survey, cold weather likely influenced attendees dissatisfaction with the conference city and the conference overall.. In analyzing our survey data we might be interested in knowing what factors most impact attendees’ satisfaction with the conference.. Using regression analysis, a survey scientist can determine whether and to what extent satisfaction with these different attributes of the conference contribute to overall satisfaction.. In the case of our conference feedback survey, cold weather likely influenced attendees dissatisfaction with the conference city and the conference overall.. In analyzing our survey data we might be interested in knowing what factors most impact attendees’ satisfaction with the conference.. Using regression analysis, a survey scientist can determine whether and to what extent satisfaction with these different attributes of the conference contribute to overall satisfaction.

How to combine demographics and psychographics with a special focus on understanding why and how people buy—and how to use these insights to make an impact with your marketing.

In this article, I’m going to show you how to combine demographics and psychographics with a special focus on understanding why people buy, how they buy, and how to use these insightsto make an impact with your marketing.. The only way to build a complete buyer persona is to combine relevant demographic and psychographic information with an understanding of what makes your target customers buy.. Example : an online poker website may discover that a substantial proportion of its users also enjoy watching football.. For marketers of consumer products as shown in these examples, these five elements might help you understand your target market.. The following five characteristics are what we at the Buyer Persona Institute call the 5 Rings of Buying Insight , which speak to the characteristics that influence buying decisions for specific products or services.. What could make a potential customer worry that they’re making the wrong choice?. Which features of competing companies, products, or services do your customers consider essential in order to make a purchase?. Focus groups are great when you want to expose your product or campaign to a target group of customers and see/hear their reactions.

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